The Five Best Photo Locations in Copenhagen.

image

A summer break in Copenhagen is highly recommended if you have never been to Denmark. The sun and heat is enjoyed by all the locals. As an introduction to the most common places you must visit we’re presenting you with this 3-hour photo walk. If you wish to cover more area more quickly bicycles are a great alternative. Or even a very different perspective can be had from the water if you want to choose a canal tour. Copenhagen is a neat city and you will notice its cleanliness as well as its flat roads which makes it easy to get around, whichever means of transport you choose to take.

image

Beginning at Frederik’s Church and Amalienborg Palace.

Amalienborg Palace is where Princess Mary lives and is a good place to start your walk. There are no walls or fences, unlike, say, Buckingham Palace in London. You can take photos of the guards and freely walk around the facade of all the buildings. Frederik’s Church is an Evangelical Lutheran Church and is popularly known as The Marble Church due to its Rococo architecture. The Marble Church is easily one of the most impressive churches of the city and with its characteristic copper green dome is an awe inspiring building.

image

image

Nyhavn.

Filled with restaurants and townhouses Nyhavn is a bright historic canal front. You can have the obligatory Danish hotdog at a food stall in this tourist hub. If you are lucky you can catch a nice sunset facing west along the canal. Cities all around the world are now looking at ways to copy the phenomenon of the Danes’s love for cycling and Copenhagen is considered as one of the “world’s most livable cities” and has been voted as the “best city for cyclists.” With over 390 kilometers of designated bike lanes Copenhagen really is a biking haven for the cyclist.

image

image

Royal Danish Library – Black Diamond.

An extension of the Royal Library is The Black Diamond which was finished in 1999. The interior from the top floor looking down the escalators looks like a guitar and its exterior show the building having shiny black facets which mirror the sea and the sky at the harbour front.

Inside the atrium is lit up by a large incision that cleaves the building into two formations. The atrium connects the city with the sea outside as well as the old and new library buildings. Weighing approximately one metric ton per meter are large iron girders which hold the glass facade together.

image

Church of Our Saviour – Vor Frelsers Kirke.

This 17th-century place of worship with a carillon and 400 steps is a baroque edifice with a corkscrew spire. You can get some spectacular views of the city from here on a clear day. This is such an important location and landmark because of all the religions in Denmark the most prominent is Christianity in the form of the Evangelical Lutheran Church. You can find some insight as to how the Danes live on houseboats when you take a stroll along the narrow canals nearby.

image

Christiansborg Palace.

Offices such as the Danish Parliament Folketinget, the Supreme Court, and the Ministry of State are all located on the tiny island of Slotsholmen where Christiansborg Palace is situated. Parts of the palace are used by the Royal Family for various functions and events. Foreign ambassadors to Denmark are received by the Queen in the Royal Reception Rooms, including the Tower Room and the Oval Throne Room. The Throne Room gives access to the balcony where the Danish monarchs are proclaimed.

image

On your walk back from here to Copenhagen Train Station you can also stop at the Town Hall and Tivoli Amusement Park. The park opened on 15 August 1843 and is the second-oldest operating amusement park in the world, after Dyrehavsbakken in nearby Klampenborg, also in Denmark.

image

Words by Elijah (Content Marketer) via Fstoppers.